Menu Close

Skopje in 1913 – Photo gallery from Albert Kahn museum

Skopje in 1913 – Photo gallery from Albert Kahn museum

Skopje in 1913 – Photo gallery from Albert Kahn museum

In 1909 the millionaire French banker and philanthropist Albert Kahn embarked on an ambitious project to create a color photographic record of, and for, the peoples of the world.

As an idealist and an internationalist, Kahn believed that he could use the new Autochrome process, the world’s first user-friendly, true-colour photographic system, to promote cross-cultural peace and understanding.

Until recently, Kahn’s huge collection of 72,000 Autochromes remained relatively unheard of. Now, a century after he launched his project, this book and the BBC TV series it accompanies are bringing these dazzling pictures to a mass audience for the first time and putting color into what we tend to think of as an entirely monochrome age.

Albert Kahn (1860-1940)
Albert Kahn (1860-1940)

 

Kahn sent photographers to more than 50 countries(including Macedonia), often at crucial junctures in their history, when age-old cultures were on the brink of being changed forever by war and the march of twentieth-century globalization. They documented in true color the collapse of the Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian empires, the last traditional Celtic villages in Ireland, and the soldiers of the First World War.
In Macedonia were sent the photographers August León and Jean Brin, in 1912-1913 during the Balkan Wars.

The photos in this article are excerpt from the publication: Macedonia in 1913 –
Autochromes from the collection of the Museum Albert Khan / Organizers:
Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Macedonia, Museum of the City of Skopje, Museum Albert Khan, French Cultural Center from Skopje, Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments and National Museum Ohrid,  Institute for Protection of Monuments of Culture. Museum and Gallery Bitola, French Alliance from Bitola

Skopje

The main entrance of Kursumli-an (leaded khan), one of Skopje's many caravanserais, built around the middle of the 16th century by Mula Musledin Hodja, son of Abdul Gani. Before the Second World War (in 1925) it was transformed into a lapidary section of the Archaeological Museum, a function it still retains today. On both sides of the entrance there are rows of shops with characteristic wooden shutters for the shops of the former Skopje shopping district. - Macedonia in 1913

The main entrance of Kursumli-an (leaded khan), one of Skopje’s many caravanserais, built around the middle of the 16th century by Mula Musledin Hodja, son of Abdul Gani. Before the Second World War (in 1925) it was transformed into a lapidary section of the Archaeological Museum, a function it still retains today. On both sides of the entrance there are rows of shops with characteristic wooden shutters for the shops of the former Skopje shopping district.


Perspective on an alley of the old shopping district. In the background, the mosque of Mustafa Pasha (15th century), photographed on the southeast side. In the foreground, an open type shoemaker shop. Instead of walls, the shop has shutters that are closed and opened as needed. The alley is paved with stones, with a gutter in the middle. - Macedonia in 1913Perspective on an alley of the old shopping district. In the background, the mosque of Mustafa Pasha (15th century), photographed on the southeast side. In the foreground, an open type shoemaker shop. Instead of walls, the shop has shutters that are closed and opened as needed. The alley is paved with stones, with a gutter in the middle.


Middle-class houses and an alley of the former Skopje shopping district. The houses have wooden grilles on the windows, which is a characteristic of Turkish houses. They are built in uncooked brick.In the background, we see the mosque of Sultan Murad (still called Hunkar), preserved until today. The Sultan Murad Mosque was built in 1436 by Murad II, the father of Sultan Mehmed II the Conqueror, and is the work of Master Hussein of the city of Debar.It was rebuilt several times, at the time of Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent, that of Sultan Ahmed III, etc. The last reconstruction took place in 1912, with the financial support of the Sultan.It was built in the style of Bursa (Bush) but since then has undergone innumerable changes. On the north-west side, there is a four-column porch, whose aesthetically decorated capitals are linked by arches. The base of the building is square.On this site, we find nowadays individual houses of the residential part of the district of Bit-bazaar.

Middle-class houses and an alley of the former Skopje shopping district. The houses have wooden grilles on the windows, which is a characteristic of Turkish houses. They are built in uncooked brick.
In the background, we see the mosque of Sultan Murad (still called Hunkar), preserved until today. The Sultan Murad Mosque was built in 1436 by Murad II, the father of Sultan Mehmed II the Conqueror, and is the work of Master Hussein of the city of Debar.
It was rebuilt several times, at the time of Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent, that of Sultan Ahmed III, etc. The last reconstruction took place in 1912, with the financial support of the Sultan.
It was built in the style of Bursa (Bush) but since then has undergone innumerable changes. On the north-west side, there is a four-column porch, whose aesthetically decorated capitals are linked by arches. The base of the building is square.
On this site, we find nowadays individual houses of the residential part of the district of Bit-bazaar.


Perspective on an alley on the left of the entrance of Kursumli-an, with a hammam now in ruins. The alley is paved with stones. The shops are leaned against the walls of the hammam. They are built in raw bricks. The photograph shows the shops of a tinsmith and a tailer. In the background, we can see the south-east side of Hammam Gurciler.The Hammam Gurciler (also known as Sengul) was built in the second half of the 15th century and formed an ensemble with the Kursumli-an (on its south-west side) and the Kazandjiler Mosque. It was Musledin Hodja who had it built. It served as a hammam until the great fire of 1689. It was known as kuri-hammam (dry bath). The 1963 earthquake destroyed it completely. The hammam is characteristic of Islamic buildings. Its cupola is covered with tiles. Today, this space is part of the courtyard of the Macedonian Museum.Perspective on an alley on the left of the entrance of Kursumli-an, with a hammam now in ruins. The alley is paved with stones. The shops are leaned against the walls of the hammam. They are built in raw bricks. The photograph shows the shops of a tinsmith and a tailer. In the background, we can see the south-east side of Hammam Gurciler.
The Hammam Gurciler (also known as Sengul) was built in the second half of the 15th century and formed an ensemble with the Kursumli-an (on its south-west side) and the Kazandjiler Mosque. It was Musledin Hodja who had it built. It served as a hammam until the great fire of 1689. It was known as kuri-hammam (dry bath). The 1963 earthquake destroyed it completely. The hammam is characteristic of Islamic buildings. Its cupola is covered with tiles. Today, this space is part of the courtyard of the Macedonian Museum.


Skopje

Porch of the complex of the Monastery of St. Savior, which is close to the citadel of Skopje. The St Savior (Holy Savior) church was built in the middle of the 16th century on the foundations of an old church. It houses a precious carved wooden iconostasis, work of famous "Mijak" engravers  - Petre Filipovski-Garkata of the village of Galicnik (in the region of Debar) and his companions, his brother Marko and Makarie Frckovski. The iconostasis was created thanks to the donations of the craft guilds and merchants of Skopje. It was completed in six years (from 1819 to 1824). The church has three naves. The central nave is vaulted, and the two side aisles are covered with a wooden ceiling.  - Skopje, Macedonia 1913Porch of the complex of the Monastery of St. Savior, which is close to the citadel of Skopje. The St Savior (Holy Savior) church was built in the middle of the 16th century on the foundations of an old church. It houses a precious carved wooden iconostasis, work of famous “Mijak” engravers  – Petre Filipovski-Garkata of the village of Galicnik (in the region of Debar) and his companions, his brother Marko and Makarie Frckovski. The iconostasis was created thanks to the donations of the craft guilds and merchants of Skopje. It was completed in six years (from 1819 to 1824). The church has three naves. The central nave is vaulted, and the two side aisles are covered with a wooden ceiling.


Burmali Mosque - Skopje in 1913. The facade of the mosque of Isak-bey, with a porch with five arches and five cupolas. The mosque is preceded by a courtyard surrounded by a wall, in front of which traders sell various goods. The mosque was built in 1475 by Isak-bey, in the style of the imperial mosques of Istanbul. The domed construction covered with lead is very interesting. 

Burmali Mosque. The facade of the mosque of Isak-bey, with a porch with five arches and five cupolas. The mosque is preceded by a courtyard surrounded by a wall, in front of which traders sell various goods. The mosque was built in 1475 by Isak-bey, in the style of the imperial mosques of Istanbul. The domed construction covered with lead is very interesting.

Skopje

Ancient plane tree on the edge of Vardar, the river that crosses Skopje and divides it into two parts. The plane tree is near the Stone Bridge. - Skopje in 1913

Ancient plane tree on the edge of Vardar, the river that crosses Skopje and divides it into two parts. The plane tree is near the Stone Bridge.


Stone bowls next to Vardar River in which the village skinners tanned the skins by trampling on them. The tannery was located on the left bank of Vardar. - Macedonia in 1913Stone bowls next to Vardar River in which the village skinners tanned the skins by trampling on them. The tannery was located on the left bank of Vardar.

Skopje

A storage where the leather was dried and which was one of the many leather storages on the left bank of Vardar River, above the old slaughterhouse and the military hospital. The city of Skopje was once a very developed center of leather craft. - Macedonia in 1913

A storage where the leather was dried and which was one of the many leather storages on the left bank of Vardar River, above the old slaughterhouse and the military hospital. The city of Skopje was once a very developed center of leathercraft.


Macedonian Orthodox family from the village of Bunardjik, located in the Skopska Blatija, twelve or thirteen kilometers east of Skopje. The whole family is dressed in the characteristic clothes of Blatija. - Macedonia in 1913

Macedonian Orthodox family from the village of Bunardjik, located in the Skopska Blatija, twelve or thirteen kilometers east of Skopje. The whole family is dressed in the characteristic clothes of Blatija.

Skopje

Two women from the Skopska Crna Gora (mountain area, about ten kilometers northwest of Skopje) sell mats. They wear the traditional dress of this region. - Macedonia in 1913

Two women from the Skopska Crna Gora (mountain area, about ten kilometers northwest of Skopje) sell mats. They wear the traditional dress of this region.


Two women from the Skopska Crna Gora mountain region, about ten kilometers northwest of Skopje. They are dressed in the traditional dress of this region. - Macedonia in 1913Two women from the Skopska Crna Gora mountain region, about ten kilometers northwest of Skopje. They are dressed in the traditional dress of this region.


Skopje

Young tradesman with a fez on his head. Photo taken in the old bazaar of Skopje. - Macedonia in 1913

Young tradesman with a fez on his head. Photo taken in the old bazaar of Skopje.

Camp of the Serbian army in the suburbs of the city. The photograph shows a panoramic view of Skopska Crna Gora. The photo is taken from the south side of the city.




 

 

 

 

Posted in Macedonia Photo Album